Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby Steve P » Sat Jul 23, 2016 12:13 pm

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=O7QsvMpiHcQ

So the knee joint extends and then flexes. Pushing with the right extends the knee joint. What I see here is that if he were still pushing how come the knee increases in flex?
His right leg goes from almost straight to bent through impact.
That's the opposite action from pushing with the right knee.
The foot is pulled by the rotation. It's not pushing or the knee would be extended. I cant see looking at this and seeing anything but a foot through impact that's weightless and getting pulled around.
I mean seriously flex your knee. He's doing the opposite of pushing. IMO the push is in the first part of the clip. When the knee is increasing in flex there can be no push. :ugeek:
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Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby Stu Carlburger » Sat Jul 23, 2016 12:22 pm

You're biomechanically wrong. Bradley shows how to do it, if you'd only take the time to try it instead of arguing every point.
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Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby Steve P » Sat Jul 23, 2016 12:30 pm

But honestly that's your response? I'm bio mechanically wrong? A sliding forward foot while the knee is increasing in flex and for you it makes sense that the weight is there?
Flexing the knee lifts the foot. Extending it applies pressure (push). Do you disagree?
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Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby Steve P » Sat Jul 23, 2016 12:35 pm

Here Lags leg flexes then extends all the way through. The right foot stays planted.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Fwo5f5Evz-I
This is right knee flexion into extension. Norman's knee goes extension INTO flexion.
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Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby Stu Carlburger » Sat Jul 23, 2016 12:38 pm

You're fixated on weight ... It's about pressure, not weight. Obviously you're not getting it. That's fine, this is an advanced technique, not a dink one ... It's not for you.
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Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby Steve P » Sat Jul 23, 2016 12:42 pm

In defense of abs I could see maybe the weight is transferring here for Norman at impact not before. My point is how could you say the sliding foot has weight? When my right foot slips in golf it goes the other way because the leg is pushing.
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Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby Stu Carlburger » Sat Jul 23, 2016 12:53 pm

GN is pushing DOWN into his right heel with everything he's got. Note that I say PUSHING down, not just standing on it with his weight. As his rotation goes around to the left he's bringing his weight into his left heel. But, he still pushing down into his right heel. He maintains that push/pressure into his right heel until he rotation pulls his right foot up, and that change causes the slide -- watch Bradley's video on footwork -- all the great ballstrikers did it. If you simply unweighted the back foot (with and early weight shift left) the right foot wouldn't slide like that. The slide is an indication that pressure still exists.
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Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby Steve P » Sat Jul 23, 2016 3:01 pm

As far as the tennis goes some basic you tube confirms it. I am a complete throwback. I believe in weight transferring through a hit through the ball old school technique which has greater racquet face stability and requires less critical timing. You wake up one day and you are obsolete. I feel like a cassette recorder. I see a lot of people on you tube trying to teach the quote modern approach to tennis. Semi western grip flex and jump and flick not enough emphasis on footwork.
I believe in everything Lag says about golf in relation to tennis. I am sure if I were deep in golf I would feel the same way.
The question I have is only one thing. During the foot slide of Norman are people really saying there is pressure in that foot?
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Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby Stu Carlburger » Sat Jul 23, 2016 4:11 pm

Yes, Steve! The foot slides because he's pressuring down into the right heel while he's rotating left. Eventually, the pressure can't hold out, but the muscles of the leg are still trying to push down, so there's are slide of the foot. If you were to take the drill series you could experience this sensation for yourself. It's not something you "try" to accomplish, is something that sort of appears when the pressures are correct and built up enough. Again, watch https://youtu.be/qrhDByp-v0E this and you'll get a better understanding of what going on. Well, actually, you won't because it's a feeling, not an image that matters -- I know, I tired to make the "moon walk" thing Norman does happen, but you can't make it happen. It wasn't until Bradley had me use the board in Drill 2 that I was able to feel it happen. It's actually pretty simple, once you realize what's going on.
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Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby Mashie72 » Sat Jul 23, 2016 5:04 pm

Steve,

I will answer your GN question on another post

I've got a question for you that might be a good match since you are an old school step into the shot tennis forehand grip player. If you like going left early with stable face/racket and linear motion towards the target, then why isn't the Ballard method perfect for you? I know you can hit it darn straight that way too.

Here at ABS like Stu says it's right leg loading, building pressure and primarily rotary motion with hard late linear just before impact.
"The secret is on the deck"
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