Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby crr » Fri Sep 21, 2012 12:31 pm

just got home from vacation and i've been chomping at the bit to try the right leg swing. very interesting results.

one of my major challenges has been avoiding the trap of over acceleration in transition. it seems almost like just taking practice swings in the spirit of the right leg loading swing john posted acts as a master sequencer for the golf swing--for me at least. in other words, the only way i can do it is if i sequence all the moving parts correctly at the right tempo.

if one tries this, one will quickly figure out that the only way one can swing with any power at all is to wait for the free ride down. once the right elbow (for a right hander) gets near or in front of the right hip and ONLY THEN can one turn, push, and accelerate. in other words, you have to wait to get your arms and hands down in front of you before you turn. that's it. there is no other way to do it. and like that...voila, over-acceleration cured and the rest of the swing is put together nicely. the interesting thing is that the feeling of the hands coming down in front of you and essentially being between your legs through impact is one of total connection to the pivot, like there is nothing at all in the way through impact.

linked is a few one leg practice swings and the resultant full swing after about fifteen minutes. i can see myself spending a lot of time on one leg in the near future...

crr
 
Posts: 372
Joined: Tue Mar 08, 2011 11:58 am

Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby eagle » Fri Sep 21, 2012 4:12 pm

That swing looks pretty dad-burned good to my eye.
User avatar
eagle
 
Posts: 1156
Joined: Thu Oct 15, 2009 7:34 am

Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby LipOut » Fri Sep 21, 2012 7:17 pm

crr wrote:just got home from vacation and i've been chomping at the bit to try the right leg swing. very interesting results.

one of my major challenges has been avoiding the trap of over acceleration in transition. it seems almost like just taking practice swings in the spirit of the right leg loading swing john posted acts as a master sequencer for the golf swing--for me at least. in other words, the only way i can do it is if i sequence all the moving parts correctly at the right tempo.

if one tries this, one will quickly figure out that the only way one can swing with any power at all is to wait for the free ride down. once the right elbow (for a right hander) gets near or in front of the right hip and ONLY THEN can one turn, push, and accelerate. in other words, you have to wait to get your arms and hands down in front of you before you turn. that's it. there is no other way to do it. and like that...voila, over-acceleration cured and the rest of the swing is put together nicely. the interesting thing is that the feeling of the hands coming down in front of you and essentially being between your legs through impact is one of total connection to the pivot, like there is nothing at all in the way through impact.

linked is a few one leg practice swings and the resultant full swing after about fifteen minutes. i can see myself spending a lot of time on one leg in the near future...



Regardless of what I think on the topic - I would echo Eagle's comments and say that you've got some pretty good stuff going on there and you've come a long way. Not perfect but who the hell is? Cheers and well done CRR.
User avatar
LipOut
 
Posts: 295
Joined: Mon May 17, 2010 8:32 pm

Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby crr » Sat Sep 22, 2012 3:04 am

thanks guys...my 'actual' golf swing on a course or a range is not quite so pretty, mostly because i get fast in transition which keeps me nice and steep. something about needing to send the ball out into space ruins my transition. hitting into a net is a little different.

i guess this is why i found it so interesting that the one leg swings are apparently so effective at sequencing the transition, because it allows you to hit as hard as you can (which i tend to like to do) but only until after the transition happens appropriately. i suspect that i would dislocate the right hip bone out of the right hip joint if i didn't...
crr
 
Posts: 372
Joined: Tue Mar 08, 2011 11:58 am

Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby Rousseau » Mon Sep 24, 2012 10:37 pm

Thanks for that, the distinction between mass and weight is an important one that's rarely made. Are we saying that at impact, the mass is left but the weight is in the right leg?
From your description then the ground forces through the right leg are down, out and then in. Would this be visable on force plates?

I always feel like my transition is a lean left with the lower half, simular to a pitch shot. I'm not sure that I creat any 'push' with the right leg. Not consciously anyway.

What's the issue with the S&T shift sideways? Presumably when misunderstood it leads to a lack of pivot action?
User avatar
Rousseau
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Sep 15, 2010 6:55 am
Location: London, England

Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby lagpressure » Wed Sep 26, 2012 9:24 am

If you "stack" weight on the left foot at the top, then you are limiting if not eliminating the positive effect of weight transferring from the right foot to the left during the impact arena. This transfer of weight and mass aids in resisting the forces of impact to keep the clubhead moving through the ball... helping minimize deceleration of the clubhead. The less the clubhead decelerates the better. This is also the reason we should work as heavy a clubhead through impact as we can handle. In general, golf clubs are too light. When you look at the clubs used by the greatest strikers, you see a lot of lead tape and beefed up golf clubs for this reason.

The other big problem with stacking weight on the left foot at the top is the decrease or elimination of proper spine tilt. Spine tilt creates a passageway or slot for the arms to come down freely on the downswing and aides in proper rotation of the shoulders, weight transfer to the right foot and aids in saving shoulder rotation for later in the swing when it is needed the most.

You really didn't hear the term "getting stuck" until this stacking craze became the talk of the golf world. If the spine is reverse shifting, the arms can't get behind the torso properly, and any attempt to do so leaves the player feeling "stuck".

st.jpg
st.jpg (54.79 KiB) Viewed 6827 times

strange.jpg
strange.jpg (72.23 KiB) Viewed 6835 times
User avatar
lagpressure
Site Admin
 
Posts: 8190
Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2009 12:50 pm

Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby twomasters » Thu Oct 04, 2012 10:29 pm

Leo Diegel could apparently shoot par and better playing off just his right leg

Leo_Diegel_Shoots_70_on_Right.GIF
Leo_Diegel_Shoots_70_on_Right.GIF (1.11 MiB) Viewed 6497 times
User avatar
twomasters
 
Posts: 7736
Joined: Tue Jun 23, 2009 3:20 pm

Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby chris_golf » Wed Oct 10, 2012 1:41 pm

lagpressure wrote:If you "stack" weight on the left foot at the top, then you are limiting if not eliminating the positive effect of weight transferring from the right foot to the left during the impact arena. This transfer of weight and mass aids in resisting the forces of impact to keep the clubhead moving through the ball... helping minimize deceleration of the clubhead. The less the clubhead decelerates the better.

The other big problem with stacking weight on the left foot at the top is the decrease or elimination of proper spine tilt. Spine tilt creates a passageway or slot for the arms to come down freely on the downswing and aides in proper rotation of the shoulders, weight transfer to the right foot and aids in saving shoulder rotation for later in the swing when it is needed the most.

You really didn't hear the term "getting stuck" until this stacking craze became the talk of the golf world. If the spine is reverse shifting, the arms can't get behind the torso properly, and any attempt to do so leaves the player feeling "stuck".


IMO you can be a right anchor player like Lee Trevino, who worked inside his feets. Or center anchor, like Sam Snead - who
was maybe the most centered player ever. Third option is left anchor, like Ben Hogan...
Maybe it has to fit your biomechanics and what feels more instinctive.
Personally I play my short Irons left anchor, middle Irons center anchor and my woods right anchor - this feels to me
natural. Even if I play left anchor there is still plenty of weight transfer and pressure flow.
There is a solution for left anchor players to have enough spine tilt...
HoganvBennett.jpg
HoganvBennett.jpg (18.91 KiB) Viewed 6147 times


Chris
"a good golf swing makes good positions rather than good positions make a good golf swing"
User avatar
chris_golf
 
Posts: 169
Joined: Thu Oct 20, 2011 12:20 pm

Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby twomasters » Thu Nov 08, 2012 1:58 am

I am sure many have seen this video below



I am involved in the largest one day pro am in Australia which is to be held on Monday November 12 at Woodlands GC in Melbourne.
Manuel De Los Santos (in video above) has been flown in to play the event and I had the opportunity to meet him today and watch him hit some balls on the range before we went and did a radio interview at MMM 105.1 to promote the day. Anyone in Melbourne should try get out and take a look at not only myself and Manuel but to get an up close look at other great pros and a whole host of celebrities who are taking part.
Inspirational stuff.......

manuelrange.jpg
manuelrange.jpg (89.72 KiB) Viewed 5851 times
User avatar
twomasters
 
Posts: 7736
Joined: Tue Jun 23, 2009 3:20 pm

Re: Right Leg Loading and Weight transfer

Postby tinman143 » Thu Nov 08, 2012 10:30 am

Great post and thanks for sharing Bradley.

Tin
tinman143
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Wed Oct 03, 2012 5:56 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Top Threads (2000 Club)

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests