Post impact acceleration

Re: Post impact acceleration

Postby HelterSkelter » Sun May 29, 2016 12:47 am

Yes. What lag says is basically what I am saying using different terminology. He says torso. I was talking about abs and obliques which is basically the same thing. Shoulders and arms arm pulled by these. Then the arms lift at the end.

Lower body stabilises. So technically the hips are stabilising if you consider the hips as hip sockets. Pelvis is moving if you consider that as part of the torso, maybe my terminology was incorrect when talking about the hips.
User avatar
HelterSkelter
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Tue May 22, 2012 6:47 am

Re: Post impact acceleration

Postby Tupac » Sun May 29, 2016 2:30 am

is it a tough drill as i do about 5 of these and then i am burn out !!!!!
if the technique is correct is the drill 3 "easy"???
Tupac
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2015 7:42 pm

Re: Post impact acceleration

Postby Tupac » Sun May 29, 2016 2:33 am

its tough doing these drills when there are no other forums where Brad's student hang out to share experiences and thoughts on the drills....
Is lag drill series the same as brad's?
is there any forum here in abs that i could participate in to learn more?
Tupac
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2015 7:42 pm

Re: Post impact acceleration

Postby HelterSkelter » Sun May 29, 2016 10:25 am

The one handed ones are tough to start with, but I would think you could do quite a few of the two handed ones.

Once you get the technique right and build a bit of strength it gets easier. You have to keep at it and just believe it gets easier, which it does.

SITD was a good place to exchange info a few years ago in the private forum, but it's not really used anymore. I agree it would be good and helpful for brads students.

Brads drills are based on the ABS ones with a couple of changes to reflect his ideas and priorities.
User avatar
HelterSkelter
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Tue May 22, 2012 6:47 am

Re: Post impact acceleration

Postby Steve P » Sun May 29, 2016 10:36 am

Well if you stabilize the left leg flexed and thus stabilize the left hip as you spouse what happens is the shoulders are turning and the hips are stalled. That's not what you want because that's the discs in the spine grinding. If the hips and shoulders keep turning together it's less injury risk.
Steve P
 
Posts: 349
Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2012 7:44 pm

Re: Post impact acceleration

Postby lagpressure » Sun May 29, 2016 4:59 pm

Steve P wrote:Well if you stabilize the left leg flexed and thus stabilize the left hip as you spouse what happens is the shoulders are turning and the hips are stalled. That's not what you want because that's the discs in the spine grinding. If the hips and shoulders keep turning together it's less injury risk.


Well, maybe that is not what you want, but it's what I have been doing for years.
Left knee straightening snappers has seen tons of injuries.

Your logic sounds practical, but is incorrect. Even if you snap the left knee and clear the left hip that won't automatically send you to a completed finish.
The torso still needs to rotate across a greater range of motion than the hips.

While you might not want that for your swing, everything about doing this will aid in post impact acceleration.

All you have to do is hit golf balls off your knees to see how this works. The limitation of hitting off the knees is the lack of weight transfer and limited counter clockwise range of motion of the shoulder rotation.
User avatar
lagpressure
Site Admin
 
Posts: 8188
Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2009 12:50 pm

Re: Post impact acceleration

Postby Steve P » Sun May 29, 2016 8:26 pm

I am for sure not advocating the left knee snap! For my thinking a steady rotation of the hips and shoulders through and past impact is what you want. Really it does not need to be a big acceleration for my taste. Just quality maintained rotation through impact. It prevents a stall and flip mode.
Steve P
 
Posts: 349
Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2012 7:44 pm

Re: Post impact acceleration

Postby Tupac » Mon May 30, 2016 2:08 am

HelterSkelter wrote:The one handed ones are tough to start with, but I would think you could do quite a few of the two handed ones.

Once you get the technique right and build a bit of strength it gets easier. You have to keep at it and just believe it gets easier, which it does.
.


I find this statement interesting in that given the hands "are coming along for the ride"
Tupac
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2015 7:42 pm

Re: Post impact acceleration

Postby HelterSkelter » Mon May 30, 2016 9:22 am

The hands are gripping the club pretty tight and the forces generated on the club are significant, especially from a start point where the club is not moving.

It takes a bit of strength in forearm, wrist and hands to simply hold on to the club and keep the pressure on it.

You also need to consider that you are holding some wristcock and holding the X too.

This is what put a lot of pressure on my left wrist area (including hand and forearm) when I first started.

That is why I say the two hand ones are a lot easier, as the weight and forces of the club are shared by both hands.

That was the limiting factor for me, not the muscles of the torso. The torso part is a bit of a workout, but for me I could have gone on for a while if it wasn't for the lack of wrist strength (albeit I'd have been puffing a bit!)
User avatar
HelterSkelter
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Tue May 22, 2012 6:47 am

Re: Post impact acceleration

Postby Stu Carlburger » Mon May 30, 2016 1:09 pm

"...I'd have been puffing a bit!"

One of the most interesting things about ABS technique is how it's the antithesis of a relaxed, tension-free action. Specifically, the compression move from the top into the transition and then into the strike is a workout, and a move in which I find myself exhaling like I do when lifting weights. Early in my learning I read about "cohesive body tension," but I didn't comprehend the full extent of them forces generated as we convert from centrifugal to centripetal. As someone who, for most of my golfing life, worked hard at eliminating tension, this feeling was very foreign. But, as I became more and more comfortable with the forces, I've learned to embrace and look for the tension as I know it's the doorway to clubface stability.

Drilling is a workout, no doubt about that!
Stu Carlburger
 
Posts: 216
Joined: Sun Mar 29, 2015 5:35 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Public Forum- Concepts in Advanced Ball Striking

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron